Khulisa Justice and Restoration Programme (JARP) is a community-based mediation programme.

Khulisa received funding from the Open Society Foundation for South Africa (OSF-SA) in 2013 to  implement a pilot year of JARP in Orange Farm (Gauteng) and Mitchells Plain (Western Cape).

Description of the project for which funding was received 

Khulisa is a non-profit organisation that focuses on community development, leadership  development, offender rehabilitation, community outreach, social entrepreneurship and Restorative  Justice Practices in the South African context. The latter serves as motivation for this project to  advocate implementation and adoption of practical actions as set out in the National Policy  Framework on Restorative Justice, thereby demonstrating the effectiveness of Restorative Justice  Processes in solving challenges related to crime, violence and conflict.  

Khulisa received funding from the Open Society Foundation for South Africa (OSF-SA) in 2013 to  implement a pilot year of JARP in Orange Farm (Gauteng) and Mitchells Plain (Western Cape).  

This project, Khulisa Justice and Restoration Programme (JARP) is a community-based mediation  programme. Victims and offenders are brought together in dialogue, facilitated by a third, neutral  party (i.e. the Khulisa mediator). Where appropriate, indirect victims affected by the crime or conflict,  e.g. family members, community members, children, school learners, teachers, etc. are also included  in the Restorative Justice processes. 

The Justice and Restoration Project (JARP) supports an approach that focuses on the needs of victims,  offenders as well as the community involved instead of viewing crimes as wrongdoing against the state.  It aims to empower the victim and focuses on reducing harmful effects of offender’s actions. Local  knowledge and capacity is utilised to provide better support for victims and offenders and to support offenders in reintegrating back into society. In addition the program adopts an integrated stakeholder  approach to justice, crime prevention and security, including partnerships between state and non-state  actors. The integrated approach complements rather than replaces the existing approaches in the  criminal justice system, enabling the relief of some of the burden from the Criminal Justice System.  

In Mitchells Plain JARP provided an alternative dispute resolution opportunity for first time offenders  when first appearing in court where their cases are diverted Out of the Criminal Justice System (CJS), through Alternative Dispute Resolution/Mediation, into Restorative Justice programmes. 

In Orange Farm JARP was used as an alternative dispute resolution opportunity for learners and school  teachers instead of school disciplinary hearings, expulsion or referral of minor cases to SAPS.

Since the launch of JARP in Mitchell’s Plain and Orange Farm a more integrated, expeditious, cost efficient and effective form of justice has demonstrated that Restorative Justice, Alternative Dispute  Resolution and mediation is a powerful tool not only in relieving courts, schools and SAPS from their  case burdens but also reducing reoffending by focusing resources on root causes of crime. 

JARP has won the full support and commitment of the Senior and Control Prosecutors as well as  Magistrates in Mitchell’s Plein and of learners, teachers, principals and community members in  Orange Farm schools. 

The project objectives are: 

More effective justice delivery and access to justice. 

More integrated stakeholder approach to justice, crime prevention and security, including  partnerships between state(schools in Orange Farm) and non-state actors;  

Alignment of community based mediation into CJS (Not applicable to Orange Farm). Low recidivism rates of JARP served offenders, within 6 / 12 months post mediation. Reduced crime, violence and conflict in local primary / secondary schools. 

It is important to note that Khulisa received the SLA from OSF at the beginning of September 2013,  however the SLA was back dated to the 1st of August 2013 as the official date of project  commencement. This resulted in the project being one month behind in schedule from the start of the  project. 

The funding amount is: R 500 000.00 (five hundred and fifty thousand rand) Non lobbying funds only. 

The project period is: 01 August 2013 – 31 August 2014. 

Reporting period: 01 August 2013 – 31 August 2014.

  1. Project Progress towards each of the specified objectives.  

The project included non-lobbying activities only. 

Orange Farm 

In Orange Farm a total number of 131 cases were mediated successfully, while additional 1809  participants at schools in Orange Farm (as listed below) benefitted from behavior change workshops  and Restorative Justice Programs facilitated during the project period. 

2.1. Objective One: More effective Justice Delivery and Access to Justice 

Orange Farm 

Orange Farm processed the school based referrals in the project, since the cost of traveling to  Vereeniging court was too high to render court based referrals viable.  

Three Orange Farm mediators were recruited and appointed in September 2013. They received  upgraded training in October 2013 to process cases referred from schools in the Orange Farm  community. See training report attached marked Annexure A. 

Schools were approached in November 2013 for referral of cases as well as facilitation of leadership  programmes. A leadership programme was arranged for the end of November 2013, however the  schools requested that the mediators return in January 2014 for mediation referrals, since the learners  were writing exams in November 2013. 

A Restorative Justice week event was facilitated on the 18th of November 2013 in Orange Farm Primary  School to commemorate International Restorative Justice Week. Twelve people from SAPS youth desk  and 70 students from Orange Farm Primary attended the event.

Three cases were referred by Orange Farm Primary for mediation to take place in January 2014, as a  result of the event. 

Nkosinathi, a Khulisa Orange Farm mediator, explains the benefit of peaceful conflict resolution through Restorative Justice Mediation to the Orange Farm Primary Learners. 

In January 2014 the first three cases referred were mediated and Orange Farm Primary gave Khulisa an office in the school where they could mediate cases referred by schools in Orange Farm. 

Cases referred by the schools were mediated as soon as parental consent was obtained and both parties were available for mediation.

Referral processes were set up and referrals were received from the following schools during the  course of the project: 

No. 

Name of school

1. 

Orange Farm Primary

2. 

Vulindlela Primary School

3. 

Reitumetsi Primary School

4. 

Zonkizizwe Primary School

5. 

Nomini Primary School

6. 

Qhakazani Primary School

7. 

Vutomi Secondary School

8. 

Qoqa secondary School

9. 

Orange Farm Secondary School

10. 

Vulanindlela Secondary School

11. 

Mpheti Mahlatsi Secondary

12. 

Leshata Secondary School

13. 

Jabulile Secondary School

14. 

Thamsqana Secondary School

Analysis of the data collected on the cases processed confirmed that 100% of the one hundred and  thirty one (131) cases were successfully mediated and resolved during the course of the project. The  recidivism rate of the parties to the 131 cases was only 3%. 

In all the cases pre-mediations were facilitated separately with the respondents and complainants in  preparation for joint mediation sessions. Once the joint mediation process has been concluded  successfully, mediators conducted follow up calls to confirm whether both participants to the  agreement adhered to the agreement within a month. 

Seven (7) secondary schools were mentored twice every Thursday of the month throughout the  project.  

The following types of cases screened and mediated:- 

Bullying 

Classroom disruptive behaviour 

Class and school bunking 

Theft 

Assault 

Insult 

Poor performance (school work) 

Mitchell’s Plain 

A total number of 136 cases were mediated during the project period of which 34% of the referrals  were received from the NPA.  

The following cases were referred: 

8.8% Assault;  

7.3% Substance Abuse;  

7.4% Child and Elderly Abuse;  

1.4% Community Disputes;  

2,9% Information; 

3.6% Gang-related; 

63% Domestic Violence-related; 

5.6% Other cases (such as Theft, Advice, etc.). 

2.2. Objective Two: More integrated stakeholder approach to justice, crime prevention and security,  including partnerships between state schools in Orange Farm and non-state actors;  

Orange Farm 

Stakeholders engaged for the duration of the project included SAPF, Ma Africa Tukkun(skills  development), SANCA, NISSA, Kids Clinic, Vulanindlela Secondary School and schools reflected in the  table in objective one, victim empowerment centre, correctional services, NPA, DoJ&CD and DOE.  The buy-in of all relevant stakeholders, partners, and role-players was obtained. 

Three of the cases referred for mediation were referred to SANCA for treatment of substance abuse,  while one case was referred to Kids Clinic. A number of other behavior change and life skills  programmes were facilitated in the participating schools. These workshops are reflected in the table  hereunder:

No. 

School 

Date Trained 

Program Facilitated 

No of  Participants

1. 

Orange Farm  Primary

14 February 2014 

6-7 June 2014 

28 May 2014 

26 March 2014 

17 June 2014

Leadership training with 10 ambassador  learners; 

Ubuntu Leadership Program with SRC  (Student Representative Committee)  learners; 

School Restorative Justice Camp at  Altelekker Youth centre with learners; Orientation session (Restorative Justice)  with educators; 

Awareness Campaign 

Issuing of certificates to SRC representative  on Leadership program.

10 

34 

10 

32 

95 

34

2. 

Vulindlela  

Primary School

07 March 2014 

14 February 2014 

7-11 July 2014 

05 February 2014

Orientation session (Restorative Justice)  with educators. 

Leadership training with ambassador  learners 

Rainbow Program with learners 

Life skills orientation program with learners

32 

20 

10 

118

  
  

02 June 2014 

Awareness on peaceful conflict resolution 

47

3. 

Reitumetsi  

Primary School

27 June 2014 

26 February 2014

Awareness Campaign with learners Orientation session with educators

68 

14

4. 

Zonkizizwe  

Primary School

14 February 2014 

25 June 2014

Leadership training with 10 ambassadors  learners 

Restorative Justice Awareness workshop

10 

93

5. 

Nomini Primary  School

14 February 2014 

31 January 2014

Leadership training with 10 Ambassadors  learners 

Restorative Justice Awareness workshop

10 

176

6. 

Qhakazani  

Primary School

24 October 2013 

20 May 2014

Orientation session (Restorative Justice)  with educators and school governing board. Restorative Justice Awareness Workshop

30 

114

7. 

Vutomi  

Secondary  

School

27 February 2014 20 February 2014

Restorative Justice Awareness Workshop  Orientation on basic principles of RJ with top  5 executive learners

86 

5

8. 

Qoqa  

secondary  

School

16 May 2014 

06 May 2014 

17 April 2014 

31 July 2014 

7 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Ubuntu Leadership training with learners Awareness Campaign on Gender Based  Violence 

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying issues  and gender based violence 

Mentorship review; 

Exit school community scan with learners; Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project

29 

147 

35 

10 

10

9. 

Orange Farm  Secondary  

School

17 April 2014 

16 May 2014 

29 May 2014 

12 June 2014 

26 June 2014 

10 July 2014

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying issues  and gender based violence 

Ubuntu Leadership orientation with  learners 

Orientation with learners on Gender Based  Violence 

Recap on Gender Based Violence and  Questions and Answers 

Basic peaceful conflict resolution with  learners 

Follow up with learners on previous sessions  Awareness on drug and substance abuse  with learners

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10

 

  

24 July 2014 

07 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Exit school community scan with learners  Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project

10 

10 

10

10. 

Vulanindlela  

Secondary  

School

17 April 2014 

16 May 2014 

29 May 2014 

12 June 2014 

26 June 2014 

10 July 2014 

24 July 2014 

07 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying issues  and gender based violence 

Ubuntu Leadership orientation with  learners 

Orientation with learners on Gender Based  Violence 

Questions and Answers on Gender Based  Violence workshop 

Sensitisation on mediation with learners Follow up with learners on previous  mediation sessions; 

Awareness on drug and substance abuse  with learners 

Exit school community scan; 

Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10

11. 

Mpheti 

Mahlatsi  

Secondary

17 April 2014 

16 May 2014 

29 May 2014 

12 June 2014 

26 June 2014 

10 July 2014 

24 July 2014 

07 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying  issues and gender based violence 

Ubuntu Leadership orientation with  learners 

Orientation with learners on Gender Based  Violence 

Review Gender Based Violence workshop: Questions and Answers 

Sensitisation on mediation with learners Follow up with learners on previous sessions  (mediation sensitisation) 

Awareness on drug and substance abuse  with learners 

Post survey school scans with learners Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10

 

12. 

Leshata  

Secondary  

School

17 April 2014 

16 May 2014 

29 May 2014 

12 June 2014 

26 June 2014 

10 July 2014 

24 July 2014 

07 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying issues  and gender based violence 

Ubuntu Leadership orientation with  learners 

Orientation with learners on Gender Based  Violence 

Review Gender Based Violence: Questions  and Answers 

Facilitation of peaceful conflict resolution  with with learners 

Follow up with learners on previous sessions  Awareness on drug and substance abuse  with learners 

Exit school community scan; 

Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10

13. 

Jabulile  

Secondary  

School

17 April 2014 

16 May 2014 

29 May 2014 

12 June 2014 

26 June 2014 

10 July 2014 

24 July 2014 

07 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying  issues and gender based violence 

Ubuntu Leadership orientation with  learners 

Orientation with learners on Gender Based  Violence 

Review Gender Based Violence and  Questions and Answers 

Sensitisation on mediation with learners Follow up with learners on previous sessions  (mediation sensitisation) 

Awareness on drug and substance abuse  with learners 

Exit school community scan; 

Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10

14. 

Thamsqana  

Secondary  

School

17 April 2014 

16 May 2014

Mentoring Peer educators on bullying issues  and gender based violence 

Ubuntu Leadership orientation with  learners

10 

10

  
  

29 May 2014 

12 June 2014 

26 June 2014 

10 July 2014 

24 July 2014 

07 August 2014 

21 August 2014

Orientation with learners on gender based  violence 

Review Gender Based Violence: Questions  and Answers 

Sensitisation on mediation with learners Follow up with learners on previous sessions  (mediation sensitisation) 

Raising Awareness on drug and substance  abuse with learners 

Exit school community scan; 

Thanking all participants for participating  throughout the project

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10

   

TOTAL NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES 

1809

Ceremony where all learners who attended the behavior change programmes received attendance  Certificates.

Mitchell’s Plain 

Monthly stakeholder and awareness events were facilitated for stakeholders in Mitchells Plain Town  Centre. 

Monthly status and impact reports were presented to state actors at the Western Cape National  Prosecuting Authority provincial stakeholder forum. 

2.3. Objective Three: Alignment of community based mediation into CJS (Not applicable to Orange  Farm). 

Mitchells Plain 

Approximately 90 cases (66% of cases received) were received from the community, i.e. walk-in  clients, which facilitated access to justice for community members and aligned community based  mediation into the CJS. 

2.4. Objective Four: Low recidivism rates of JARP served offenders, within 6 / 12 months post mediation. 

Orange Farm: 

The cases processed in Orange Farm had a 0% recidivism rate. This can be attributed to the integration  of mediation with behaviour change programmes and teaching learners and teachers basic conflict  resolutions skills. 

Mitchell’s Plain 

In Mitchell’s Plain the following processes were successfully facilitated to reduce the recidivism rate  of participants to mediation: 

Weekly Counseling, Support and Educational sessions were facilitated with perpetrators; Perpetrators were all referred to a partnering organization, i.e. Mosaic, for anger  management and violence education programmes; 

Weekly ‘One Less Victim’ sessions were facilitated with the victims of violence, in order to  empower these individuals to assist their partners managing their violent behavior. 

2.5. Objective Five: Reduced crime, violence and conflict in local primary / secondary schools.

Prior to the programme commencing a school scan was conducted in the respective schools to  establish a research baseline on the level of crime, violence and conflict in Orange Farm schools. 

Upon conclusion of the programme an exit school scan was conducted in the participating Orange Farm  schools, in order to measure the impact of the programme. 

The following was established: 

Upon commencement of the programme,the baseline research showed that 60.94% of learners were  of the opinion that they do not have access to Justice and the school authorities, in comparison to  84.62% of the learners who felt that they do have access to Justice and the school authorities upon  conclusion of the project. This reflects a 45.56% increase in learners who felt that they had access to  Justice. 

Baseline research showed that 54.69% of learners felt very unsafe in their schools upon  commencement of the project, while 58.97% of the learners felt fairly safe in their schools upon  conclusion of the project. The feeling of safety and access to justice thus increased significantly during  the course of the project. 

Baseline research showed that 71.79% of learners were not satisfied with the way that their schools  dealt with conflict/crime in the schools in comparison to 40% of learners being satisfied and 60% of  learners being very satisfied with the way the schools deals with conflict upon conclusion of the project.  The impact of the mediation services rendered in these schools is clearly reflected in the vast increase  in learner satisfaction levels with the way that their schools deal with conflict and crime. 

Baseline research showed that 66.67% of learners felt that they received no justice in the way their  schools dealt with conflict/crime, in comparison to 100% of the learners feeling that they do receive  justice in school in the way that they deal with crime/conflict.  

It can be concluded, as reflected hereinabove, that the JARP programme had a significant impact in  reducing crime and violence and increasing access to justice to learners in Orange Farm schools.  

Outline successes, challenges and setbacks encountered during the reporting  period impacting on the achievement project set objectives. Provide a brief  description of how you dealt with problems encountered. 

Orange Farm: 

Challenges and Solutions 

The delay of commencement of the project resulted in the recruitment and training of the mediators  only being complete in October 2013.  

The final year exams commenced in November 2013 which resulted in the Orange Farm schools  requesting that all mediation services stand over until January 2014, leaving only 7 months of the  project to process cases. 

The challenges were addressed by using the time to build up contact with the teachers and principals  of a large number of schools to ensure visibility and a high number of referrals in January 2014. 

Successes 

The impact of the Restorative Justice processes, mediation and behavior change programmes implemented in the Orange Farm schools is reflected in comments made by the students, teachers and  principals:

What Students Say 

“….i realizes that I was doing things that I should not have been doing and making big  mistakes…I learned…in this process is that I have a bad attitude and I could do better for  myself”. Student 

“…I have gained self-confidence and have found myself helping others. I realize that they are  capable of being accountable for their actions. I have also learned how to be a better person  by not judging others”. Student 

“…I realize that I have come a long way from where I was then. I have become a bigger person  and have learned to think about my actions before I do them…If I talk about a problem…I can  keep myself from doing something I may regret later. I used to believe that I did not have much  control over how I react to events, but now I realize that it’s up to me how I react and I cannot  blame my anger for all my problems”. Student 

What Teachers and principals say:- 

“Since the implementation of Restorative Justice has been on our school, our suspension rate  has dropped and our drop out has decreased by approximately 50%.” Principal 

“…students like being “heard”…many of our students…don’t even know certain actions are wrong. This opens the door to teach students acceptable and appropriate behaviours,  behaviours that will be expected of them in mainstream society.” Teacher 

“(The program) allows students an opportunity to be accountable for their actions in a non threatening way with a productive positive outcome being the end results.” Student  representative teacher 

Mitchells Plain: 

Challenges and Solutions 

Mitchells Plain mediators were increasingly receiving more serious domestic violence cases (both walk in clients and SAPS referrals); The mediators did not have sufficient skills to process these cases  successfully and needed additional skills and confidence.

Additional training, assessment and supervision were provided by Khulisa’s Restorative Justice Expert,  George Lai Thom, from 30 June to 3 July 2014, through which the mediators gained the necessary skills  and confidence they required 

Successes 

JARP Mitchells Plain collaborated with an external researcher to establish the impact the JARP had on  domestic violence in Mitchells Plain 

The results from this research reflected that JARP significantly impacted on the peaceful resolution of  Domestic Violence in the community 

Key findings of the research indicated that: 

In 45% of the cases violence had stopped; and 

In 50% of cases violence had reduced to non-physical or less. 

The programme monitoring confirmed the direct impact on individuals’ lives and better functioning of  families, as depicted in the following direct quotes from mediation participants: “Mediation helps a lot, we could talk and there is no more fighting” 

“I felt I could apologize to the victim and talk freely about what had happened without  being judged” 

“My son-in-law repaid the damage and apologized” 

“We live a positive life since the mediation” 

“Gave us more clear picture of solving problems” 

“We can talk civil with each other now” 

“After all these years I have peace of mind” 

“This changed my son’s life” 

Key successes for both Orange Farm and Mitchell’s Plain include: 

Firm and enthusiastic buy-in from the stakeholders such as Dept. of Justice (DoJ&CD)  National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), Orange Farm schools and SA Police Service (SAPS); The exceeded targets for the numbers of referred cases to mediators; 

Clients were contacted within 5 days form referral, as opposed to lengthy delays at court; High level client satisfaction rates, average over 90%, by both victims and offenders; 80% of cases both parties have kept to the Mediation Agreement in 3 months (14% client  sample);

Turning the tide on domestic violence, most common type of case referred: 43%  reoffending rate in 2-6 months after the mediation (85% national estimate); and 25 partnerships achieved locally enabling number of referrals.

Please indicate whether OSF-SA is providing the required and necessary  inputs on schedule and whether these are effective in providing the desired  outputs. Provide comment on whether the funding is adequate to finance the  required activities.  

OSF-SA provided the required and necessary inputs on schedule. 

The funding was adequate to implement the activities in general in Orange Farm, however the salaries  paid to the facilitators were very low, especially when taking into account the amount of work that  they put into the project, and the transport budget was not sufficient when taking into account the  size of Orange Farm and the distances between the schools.

Describe any key lessons you have learned and how you are sharing them  and the results of the project, both internally and externally. This should  include a brief summary of preliminary or final findings from any internal or  external evaluations that have been undertaken. Please provide detailed information regarding any anticipated deviations  from the project plan or changes to the time line and budget.  

A request was submitted to OSF in July 2014 to extend the project until the 31st of August 2014, since  surplus funds were still available and the service provided by Khulisa in Orange Farm and Mitchell’s  Plain was needed. 

OSF granted the request and the project was extended to the 31st of August 2014.

If this is a final report, briefly describe the next phase of the project  (continuation, expansion, replication or termination) and if you plan to  continue with the work, any resources that you have secured to sustain it.  

A key concern for almost all non-profit civil society organisations – including Khulisa – is that they are  forced to operate on annually renewable contracts and funding budgets. Their programmes may be  interrupted, fragmented or underfunded, and as a result are not as effective or sustainable as they  could (or should) be.  

The funding granted to Khulisa during this project period, empowered Khulisa to build a good ‘case  study’ for Government (and other prospective funders) to prove the necessity and impact JARP can  have for communities, but also the struggling CJS. During this grant period, JARP delivered tangible  results on scale whilst resulting in significant time and cost savings to government. In addition, there  is growing evidence that ADR, restorative justice, diversion and youth-at-risk skills development and  mentoring programmes have had success in helping vulnerable young people to change their course  in a sustained way. These programmes diminish court backlogs, bullying in schools and address the  underlying personal factors that contribute to crime. Importantly, linking these efforts to skills  development and job placement ensure their sustainability in the longer term. 

Khulisa was fortunate to receive funding from the Western Cape Department of Social Developmentt’s  Victim Empowerment Programme to continue the JARP and mediation site in Mmitchells Plain for the  period 1 October 2014 to 31 March 2015. Based on the further results the project is mandated to  achieve, the Department of Social Development will commit to JARP Mitchells Plain for a three-year  period and providing funding for the project to deliver social services to those who need it most.

A number of proposals have been submitted for funding for JARP in schools in Orange Farm, including  the French Embassy. It is clear that a need exists for the continuation of the services, however funding  for programmes in Orange Farm is scarce. A measure of sustainability has been achieved in the  schools where the programme had been implemented in that a few teachers were trained in basic  mediation skills; however there were not sufficient funds to train the teachers and learners as  mediators and mentor them. 

Khulisa continues to apply for funding for JARP in schools in Orange Farm since there is a clearly  identified need in the community and schools for the JARP programme being implemented by the team of mediators (Peter Kapaso, Nkosinathi Mthembu and Clement Kunene), who have worked  tirelessly in rendering this much needed mediation service to the Orange Farm schools and who have  gone over and above the call of duty in implementing this project, however until further funding has  been secured active mediation services have been terminated in Orange Farm.

Please provide a detailed financial report documenting spending over the  grant period.  

See interim financial report and letter attached. 

OSF-SA requires a standard financial reporting format that includes a  bifurcated budget into lobbying and non-lobbying activities. The report should  also refer specifically to the line items in the budget attached to the original  grant agreement.  

Please note in the financial report any significant deviations on particular line  items and the reasons for this. (It may be that the funds will only be expended  in the next reporting period). If this is a final report please note that OSF-SA  will require your most recent audited statements as soon after the end of the  grant period as possible.

If there have been any changes to governance structures of the organisation  please notify OSF-SA of these changes in the progress report

Khulisa’s board of directors has changed. Please see table below.

MEMBERS’ NAMES 

QUALIFICATIONS 

AREAS OF EXPERTISE 

EMAIL ADDRESS

BA Social Science 

Business Leadership &  

MOKHOBO, Dawn 

dawn@partnershipi.co.za 

Management 

Chairperson 

Programme in Strategic  

Since June 2014 

Transformation. 

Transformation and  

Development 

Dinah@partnershipi.co.za

ID: 481030 0598 081 

Conflict Resolutions? 

VAN SELM, Lesley  

Ann 

Managing Director 

Since 1997 

ID: 551014 0021 083

Diploma Creative Writing Diploma Advanced  

Tourism 

Diploma Short Story  

Writing

General Management;  Social Entrepreneur; 

Marketing Prog  

Implementation; 

Programme Development

angie@khulisa.org.za

SIMELANE 

MODISELLE, Phephile Deputy Chairperson 

Since June 2014 

ID: 830119 0419 089

Bachelor of Commerce  (Wits) 

Strategy 

Employee Engagement Communications 

Leadership

phephile@truenorthpath.co.za

QWEMESHA, Zamile  Dugmore 

Deputy Chairperson 

Since July 2011 

ID: 760202 5510 088

BA (Law) 

LLB (UWC) 

Admitted attorney of the  High Court

Legal Counselor 

zamile.qwemesha@sasol.com

CLINNING, John  

Kenneth 

Acting Treasurer 

Since July 2014 

ID: 451125 5090 088

CA (SA)

Financial Accounting 

clinning@hixnet.co.za

LUBEGA, Melvyn 

Non Exec Director 

Since Jan 2013 

ID: 890911 531 6089

Bachelor of Business  

Science – Actuarial  

Science (Honours) 

(UCT)

Management Consultant Economic Development Leadership 

Training and development Enterprise development Strategy 

lubega.melvyn@bcg.com 

Melvyn.Lubega@gmail.com

MADINGINYE, Thulani  Dumisani Success 

Non Exec Director 

Since Jan 2013 

ID: 850928 522 9086

Masters in Commerce – Applied Economics 

Bachelor of Business  

Science (Honours) – 

Economics

Research and consulting Strategic support with  

government 

Enterprise development Leadership 

tudusuc@yahoo.com

MANN, Ian Charles 

Non Exec Director

Strategic Midwifery and  Implementation

Strategy development 

Leadership

 
  

Since Jan 2013 

ID: 5202165070084

 

Communication 

Training and development High net worth individuals

ianmann@gatewaysconsultants .com 

administration@gateways.co.za

McCARTNEY, Donna Executive Director 

Since Nov 13 

ID: 5709160171089

Diploma in Human  

Resources Management

Specialising in people  

development 

donna@khulisa.org.za

MAKHUBELE, Khomi  Climus 

Non Exec Director 

Since July 2011 

ID: 700820 545 6086

MBA (De Montfort  

University) 

B.Com (Oxford Brookes  University) 

Masters in Commerce  (Unisa)

Marketing 

kcmakhubele@quest.co.za nosiphop@quest.co.za

MVULANE, Precious  Makhosazane  

Khanyisile 

Non Exec Director 

Since Mar 2012 

ID: 760929 0582 080

Chartered Accountant  (University of Natal) 

Registered Auditor  

(University of Cape Town)

Auditing 

Accounting especially with  NGOs

khosi@gadcs.co.za

It can be concluded that the objectives as reflected in the Service Level Agreement have been achieved  and that the project has had a significant impact on the Orange Farm and Mitchell’s Plain communities. 

It can further be concluded that a further need for Restorative Justice Interventions exist in both  Orange Farm and Mitchell’s Plain and that the communities would benefit from further funding of the  JARP project in these areas. 

We trust you find this in order. 

Kindly contact the writer hereof should you have any queries.

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